Stories, Family Trees & Records from Members – Members Only

Introducing

The Clan Irwin Genealogy Initiative

Stories, Family Trees, & Records from Clan Irwin Members

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(1922-2022)

Helen Irwin Shuster

Mom was born in Bloomsburg, PA, Oct. 14, 1922, and died in Arlington, VA, Oct. 18, 2022. She was the wife of Dr. Carl N. Shuster, Jr. (1919-2020). Mom and Dad met as the result of a date arranged by their two fathers when Mom’s Dad was Vice President and Dad’s Dad Chairman of the Math Department at what is now the College of New Jersey in Trenton. Apparently, the fathers’ instincts were sound, as Mom and Dad got married in 1944 and enjoyed 76 years of happy marriage together.

They had five sons, including the unique situation that the first four were born as two sets of twins less than a year apart, a circumstance that led to a quite coincidental “small world” story. Dad was 6’4″ and a three-sport letterman at Rutgers; Mom was 5’9″ and also athletic. All five sons were well over 6 feet tall, which a good thing for the sport of rowing. One October the four twins (racing in their boat named Twinshell, pronounced either as Twin Shell or Twins Hell) came in second at the Head of the Charles in Boston to a very good four from Dallas. The next month one of the Dallas crew went home to North Carolina for Thanksgiving. He told his parents that he had had fun beating the famous brothers, two sets of twins less than a year apart. His mother asked if he remembered their name. Apparently, we were so famous he did not, at which point she asked: “Was their name Shuster?” “How did you know?” “Two sets of twins so close gave it away. Their mother and I were roommates in college!”

Mom was very proud of her Scotch Irwin heritage. She was the eighth Irwin in her line in America and traced the American line back to the Immigrant (see below). She was a long-time member of the Clan Irwin Association, and she made sure each son had a subscription to “The Holly Leaf Chronicles”. She visited Drum Castle. Her third son’s middle name is Irwin. Mom also inherited a healthy dose of Scotch stoicism. When things were not going exactly according to plan, she could often be heard reminding herself and anyone within earshot: “Endure awhile and hope for better things”.

She would have been very supportive of the Drum Castle document case project.

George W. Shuster

PS The direct line in America:

1) Immigrant (1720) George Irwin (1685-1748) m. Jane Matlack) (c.1698-)
2) Robert Irwin (1740-1796) m. Mary Means (1726[?]-1829)
3) (No. Carolina) Samuel Irwin (1764-1820[?]) m. Elizabeth Worthington (1760-1848)
4) John Irwin (1794- ) m. Hannah Hitton (-)
5) James Irwin (1824-1904) m. Elizabeth Kirkman (1824-1928)
6) Robert Irwin (1856-1946) m. Emma Foust (1863-1954)
7) (Ohio, Indiana) Forrest A. Irwin (1888-1977) m, Leone Talbert (1893-1984)
8) Helen Irwin (1922-2022) m. Carl N. Shuster, Jr. (1919-2020)
9) Five sons in order: George, Ken, Chris, Carl III (Neal) and Forrest
10) Six grandchildren
11) Nine great grandchildren (so far)

My Irwin Story

Kyle David Eriwn

I was born and raised in Peoria, Illinois. Growing up I never heard “stories” about the Erwin family. Sure, there were a few snippets of information, such as we were from the villages of Sebree and Beach Grove, Kentucky. Or that my grandfather, Stambaugh Erwin, was named after the local preacher. Then there was the legend that our original last name was spelled “Ierwin”” (more on that later, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves…)

I suppose the reason for the lack of Erwin lore was that my grandfather was the youngest of his siblings, with the oldest almost twenty years his senior. As a result, the only time we had “family reunions” were what others call funerals. My grandfather passed away when I was in high school, and my father was an only child. The rest of the family did not live near us, so I never really interacted with the other family members.

Fast forward to 2009 when I met and married Paula. Her mother is very interested in genealogy. In Kentucky the state sport (after UK and Louisville basketball) is figuring out how we are related to everyone else. She offered to start a family tree in Ancestry and Family Tree. This piqued my interest in things Erwin, and I began to do some internet research into our family history. Then one day Paula had to spend the day in Evansville, Indiana for business. I knew that Sebree and Beach Grove were across the river from Evansville, so I dropped Paula off for work and headed into Kentucky. My main objective was to find my great grandfather’s grave. What I found were multiple graveyards (in various states of repair or disrepair). One graveyard had multiple tombstones with the name “Eirwin”. So, the old story was correct, just transposed letters. That’s one family mystery solved (later research revealed that Erwin and Eirwin were used somewhat interchangeably in the records of the family). I did find my great grandfather Charles Lyman Erwin’s grave. What I also found was an older site with my third great-grandfather Robert Hutchinson Erwin’s grave. That name will be important later.

In my internet searches I stumbled across the Clan Irwin Association website, and I joined the CIA. That year (2018 I believe) Paula and I attended the now defunct Glasgow Highland Games in Glasgow, Kentucky. It was there that I met Barbara Edelman who with the adroitness of a Barbary pirate within a few minutes shanghaied me into becoming the Kentucky Commissioner!

Being active on the Clan’s Facebook page, one day I saw a post of a memory on one of the Clan members, Steve Erwin, that consisted of a few photographs of his family members visiting Erwin graves in southeastern Missouri. I knew from my research that some Erwins did move to that area in the mid-late 1800’s. Steve and I started to compare notes and lo and behold we are both descendants of Robert Hutchinson Erwin (see-I told you it would be important!). I later took the BigY genetic test, and Steve is my closest genetic relative confirming our genealogical research.

Back to my visit in Beach Grove. There is a nice, albeit small, genealogy center in Beach Grove. (Interestingly it is located at an intersection that contains the only stoplight in the county-they were quite proud of it). While there I located a handwritten tree of another descendant of Robert H. Erwin. Unbeknownst to me then, I later learned that the tree was a line that belongs to Leslie Smeathers, our current Association Corresponding Secretary.

The high point so far in my Erwin journey was the Clan trip to Scotland. Not only did we enjoy the beauty of Scotland, but to be able to actually touch and experience our history was beyond compare. Of course, the story (or should I say journey) is to be continued… Let Irwin Flourish!

Story

Henry Frost Erwin

Henry Frost Erwin, our father, was born September 6, 1895, in Slagle, Missouri, in the days of horses and buggies. He lived to see astronauts landing on the moon! He was the first born of seven children to William Alston Erwin and Mary Frost. William Alston Erwin was born June 19, 1859, and he had written a history of his Erwin family which passed down to me around 25 years ago. William stated that his father was George Council Erwin, born 1829 east of Zanesville, Ohio. George was from a large family, and four of his siblings were William, David, Martha, and Lydia. William said he did not know who George’s father was. Our cousin, Brenda, took that information and found out that George Council Erwin’s father was Edward Erwine, born c. 1803.

Henry was born at a very bad time. Missouri was a border state during the American Civil War and there was still much hatred between the North and South leaning families. Henry’s family soon moved to the Rocks, Hills, Ticks, Chiggers, and Snakes land of Baxter County in North Central Arkansas and later back to Missouri. He told about driving a horse-drawn wagon from Springfield, MO to Baxter County, Arkansas – a distance of about 130 miles on today’s roads. It took several days to make the journey. He built campfires and slept on the ground. Baxter County was occupied by hard working families with little Cash Assets. It was mostly a Barter system where extra eggs were traded for apples or wheat flour, etc. Most land had not been paid for. It was given through Land Grants to men or descendants of men who had fought in one of our many wars. How much land was Granted was based on a soldier’s rank, duration of time in service and battles fought.

Usually, 60 to 640 acres. Henry worked hard on the family farm, walking behind a single blade plow pulled by a mismatched team of horses, and he worked the garden, too. He did find a Cash Paying job that basically had no end during his time. He and a friend operated a cross-cut saw and dropped trees. They removed all limbs and cut the trunk into lengths for a wood fence. They split the logs into two pieces and cut those into two more pieces, maybe split them again based on how large the tree was. The split logs were laid in a zigzag shape on the ground around the property. More split logs were laid on top of them until the required height was reached. The job never ended because the bottom logs were consumed by termites, carpenter ants and other insects, and more logs had to be added at the top. Henry’s second employer saw what a hard worker he was and paid him 50% more salary. His first job paid one cent per hour, one dime for a 10 hour day. When he had worked 10 hours a day for 10 days, he would have a dollar, which was enough to buy an acre of land. His second employer paid him 1 1/2 cents per hour, a great improvement.

As World War I started, Henry and others realized that their male friends were disappearing. After some time, the missing men sent letters telling how they were approached by a large truck, asked questions about name, home address, etc. and then were told they had to get into the truck as they were now in the Army. They were trained and sent to the horrible trench war in Europe. Henry did not want to go to the trenches so he found out where a Navy recruitment center was located in Little Rock, Arkansas. He walked the approximate 135 miles during the nights to keep from meeting up with the large truck. He worked small jobs along the way for food and a place to sleep.

Henry spent the rest of WWI as a gunner’s mate on Battle Ships. His crew of six men would load four ninety pound bags of powder into the cannon. Then an 18 inch diameter shell was inserted. I have no memory of how the powder was ignited. At the war’s end, Henry was transported to St. Louis, Missouri. There the Navy told him he was released and could go home. Henry asked if they would give him transportation, money or other means to make the 250 mile trip home. They told him no help; he could stay in the Navy or leave. So, he started out walking and hitching rides and working for food and bedding along the way. Now, it was no problem with the large trucks so he could travel during day light. (Small towns in Missouri and Arkansas usually have a WWI memorial with the names of men killed during the war because there were so many killed.)

He didn’t talk much about his wartime experience. One highlight he mentioned was a visit by his ship to Havana, Cuba. During WWII, at age 46, he had to register for “Old Man’s Draft.” (It was not intended that these men be drafted into military service, but to determine if their labor skills could be used in the war effort.)

Henry’s oldest son, Gene, served two years in the Army in WWII; his next son, Glenn, served 26 years in the Army in many places; his next son, Ivan, served 2 years in the Army as an M.P. in Germany; and his baby, Ronald, spent 6 years in the Air Force during Vietnam. Henry told us he and other families in his area had no real problem with the Great Depression as nothing much changed for them. They had little money at the start, and no jobs to lose, so nothing was taken from them. They did get a great gift as the government started getting money out to the people through WPA projects, etc. at the end. The government came through the area and bought anything the families wanted to sell. They paid a very good price for crops, hay, animals, tools, etc. Every family now had “CASH.” The government bulldozed a large hole and buried everything that had been purchased and then left. Then the sellers dug up their stuff and took it back home along with the cash!

Henry worked one day on the construction of a dam on the Norfork Dam in Northern Arkansas around 1940. He said that one day was enough for him because when the crew finished work that day, the crew loaded into the back of a truck. Henry was the last man to get on the truck. The man ahead of him took the last seat on one side and Henry had the last seat on the other side. On the journey back to their housing, the truck overturned. Henry’s hard hat was split in two. The man on the other side of the truck was killed. But for chance, Henry would have been in that seat.

In 1948, Henry and family moved to Kansas City, Missouri, where he and the family obtained jobs and led a normal city life.

I (Ron) joined Ancestry DNA with a family tree going back to Edward Erwine. Matches to me started coming in from other descendants of Edward Erwine. My tree expanded. I went to Zanesville, Ohio and found a very good Genealogy Library with information on his marriages. The County Court House had many land purchases and sales records. On one sales record, Edward and three of his sons sold a property and all four spelled their name differently when signing. Another document showed Edward was purchasing land and when Edward paid for the land, he would receive title to the land. Each time Edward’s surname was spelled differently. The Court House had Edward’s Probate from his death which listed his wife and children. Edward had 13 children with his first wife and 5 with his second wife.

I Googled Census Records and found a list of Edward’s children and one showed Edward was born in Pennsylvania and one showed he was born in Virginia. We learned that part of southwest Pennsylvania was once part of Virginia. We went to Pennsylvania 3 times looking for records. We went to the DAR headquarters in Washington, DC twice.
We went to the Sons of the American Revolution (comparable to DAR) headquarters in Louisville, KY several times. There, we found the records of hundreds of those who fought, with various spellings of Irwin. Once I found an ancestor with whom I could match, I used him to join SAR.

Later, I did the DNA test at 23andMe. They have matched me to 1,501 relatives who have also done their DNA test with them. They have told me I am descended from “Niall of the Nine Hostages.” Niall is believed to be a King in Ireland around 400 A.D. It is estimated that there are 2-3,000,000 living descendants of Niall at this time.

My brother, Ivan A. Erwin, found and joined Clan Irwin Association. Then, he did the FTDNA test when 67 markers was the highest-level test available. He joined the Clan Irwin Surname yDNA Study, administered by James M. Irvine. I joined Clan Irwin Association and the yDNA Study when it had advanced to 111 markers. I upgraded to the Big Y-500 test and then to the Big Y-700 test when they became available. This study shows that I am descended from y-DNA Haplogroup R-BY3699, which is the same as the Lairds of Bonshaw. So the Lairds of Bonshaw Tower are my grandfathers, uncles, or cousins.

The number of markers in the y-DNA Study keeps growing and today is 1,360,068. That is the number of Variants my DNA is broken into and compared to others when they have also done the Big Y-700 test. Today, 107 men have done the Big Y test and are related to me. Twenty-five (25) men match me at over 1 million parts. My very closest match is 1,314,791 and it’s not my brother!

I suggest to any man looking for ancestors to join FTDNA and purchase the 67 marker test. Then, request to join the Clan Irwin Surname yDNA Study to learn which branch of the “Clan” you are descended from. Buy James M. Irvine’s book, The Irwin Surname, its Origins, Diaspora and Early Branches, from Amazon for about $20. This tells about the clan in general and has information on the various branches. I enjoy reading all of it. In one book, I found where the Irwins et al, were a tribe in what is now Greece, around 133
B.C. When the Romans moved that way, we went to Egypt; when the Romans moved south, we went to western Spain. The Romans came that way, too, so we moved to Ireland. Around 373A.D., we fought the Romans and most of our adult men were killed. Written By Ronald Lynn Erwin, the baby child born 1944, and Ivan Alson Erwin, next to
youngest child born 1940, and now the oldest living. Contact us if you have any questions, Ron — 318-791-6343 or email, [email protected], and Ivan — 720-660-1200 or email [email protected].

Clan Irwin Bio

David A. McCormich

I first took an interest generally in genealogy in 1957-8, when we were doing some house cleaning at my grandparents. I come from a long line of pack rats. One of the things that turned up in that house cleaning was a type of written genealogy that a lawyer cousin (on another branch) had sent to my grandfather in 1931, as the former prepared for a family reunion. That encouraged me to start researching other branches. As I came from a family of farmers who had pioneered western Pennsylvania in the late 1700s and early 1800s and had remained there for generations, this just entailed visiting a few local cemeteries with my maternal grandmother. She pointed everyone out to me — even those not related to her. A couple elderly cousins contributed some added details on their branches. I soon had four or five generations on all branches of my ancestry. That level of inquiry quenched my initial (easy to find) need for genealogy. After college and the Army, I attended law school. This gave me TIME and another chance to explore filling in details on various branches the names of children (NOT JUST MY ANCESTOR) in each family. It is important to NOT JUST RESEARCH YOUR ANCESTOR, BUT THEIR SIBLINGS and spouses as discussed below.

During this period, I met a couple distant cousins on different branches who were interested in genealogy and like myself had made an initial start of some magnitude. One of these was Paul W. Myers (who was a third cousin on my Irwin connection). Paul was working in Butler, Pennsylvania when I was attending law school in Pittsburgh. Everything was largely by US Mail in those days. Paul had documented (public records) the early years (1797) of the family of Charles Blair (1753-1810) and his wife, MARY IRWIN (1751-1796) who settled in what became Plaingrove of Mercer (later Lawrence) County, Pennsylvania. That contact about 1972 was my initial contact with my gggggrandmother, Mrs. Mary Irwin Blair (1751-1796), my closest person of the clan surname. She had been married initially to a JAMES SMITH (1744-1778) killed in the American Revolution at what is now called Hatboro, Pennsylvania. MARY IRWIN soon remarried to Charles Blair who helped raise her Smith children and their own children.
There were three SMITH children: MARY, GRACE and WILLIAM SMITH. The fact that there were children of differing surnames later helped me identify MARY IRWIN’s parents. I didn’t see Paul Myers for a few years. I worked in Philadelphia and Paul eventually had a job in DC. In the Fall of 1978, I joined a law office near Washington DC. One day, I again ran into my cousin Paul Myers in the Library of Congress (genealogy room). I used that facility and the DAR Library at 1776 D Street NW in doing research on many of my family branches. At some point I was directed to look in the direction of CHESTER COUNTY, Pennsylvania for further Irwins. The DAR Library had a multi-volume set of CHESTER COUNTY WILL ABSTRACTS. Therein was the Will (dated 1 APR 1793) of William Irwin (1722-1794) of Honeybrook Farm in West Nantmeal Township, CHESTER COUNTY, Pennsylvania In addition to bequests to his children, the Will made provision for the gift BY NAME a small cash bequest to the eldest granddaughter Grace and to Grace, Mary and William Smith, the children of (then) Mrs. MARY BLAIR (by name) of one BIBLE for each. The WILL of William Irwin, dated 1 APR 1793, probated 12 FEB 1795, from Abstract of Wills and Administrations of Chester County (PA), (4 volumes), compiled by Jacob Martin, indexed by Gilbert Cope, Volume 3 (1777-1800), page 431, Document 4419.

With all that detail, I knew I had the right people. That was probably around 1980. During the 1990s, I made contact with a descendant of the first marriage of MARY IRWIN to James Smith (1744-1778) before she married my ancestor Charles Blair (1753-1810). The SMITH line descendant from MARY IRWIN is a lad (now an old man) named Mr. Glen Gealy who resides near Columbia, Maryland. I learned a bit about those half-cousins from him. The intestate estate (no will) papers of JAMES SMITH were filed intestate estate papers of James Smith dated 29 June 1778 in Orphans’ Court No. 4283 for Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. SMITH’s NSSAR file number is 88636. I filed a supplement (one of many) for CHARLES BLAIR’s (1753-1810) Revolutionary War service at NSSAR 102713.

The father of WILLIAM IRWIN (1722-1794), George Irwin (died 1748) owned Honeybrook farm in Chester County, emigrated from Northern Ireland with letters of introduction to the Quaker Meeting at Mount Holly, New Jersey in 1720 with several relatives. In GLOUCESTER COUNTY, New Jersey in 1733, George Irwin leased a farm near the land of William Matlack. The lease is in New Jersey State Archives. Later, Irwin owned a farm at Honeybrook, on the banks of Brandywine Creek in West Nantmeal Township, Chester County. A lot of early Scotch-Irish were in the western part of Chester County. George Irwin and his wife are buried at the “Old Seceder Graveyard” (a small walled-in cemetery) near the Brandywine Manor Presbyterian Church Cemetery (where George’s son, William Irwin 1722-1794 buried),

Chester County, Pennsylvania. George Irwin’s (died 1748) Will abstract is also in the aforementioned volumes of CHESTER COUNTY WILLS. I have walked both cemeteries and seen the graves. Most unserious genealogists DO NOT REALLY TAKE TIME TO DO THAT. The sister (and her husband, Ephraiam Allen) of my Mrs. MARY IRWIN BLAIR (1751-1796) is buried next to Mary’s parents, in a marked grave. You find that out by GOING TO THE CEMETERY.

About seven or eight years later (say 1990), I first visited the CLAN IRWIN TENT at the Virginia Scottish Games. In those days CLAN ASSOCIATION FOUNDER, Ralph Irwin and his wife were in attendance, as was a wonderful, retired navy officer named HARRY IRWIN. He was then styled “Clan Seneschal” i.e. the genealogist. Harry had a massive collection of 65,000 “family group sheets” of Irwin material (not indexed). It was in his garage. Because I had ALREADY DOCUMENTED my descents to the Irwin family of Honeybrook Farm in Chester County, Pennsylvania I had enough data points to BE ON THE RADAR when I chatted with Harry Irwin. He introduced me to the back issues of Holly Leaf Chronicle, which on occasion had scraps of information about a sibling or relative of MY IRWIN connection. The clan sold photocopies of Holly Leaf Chronicle, for a fee. Within a year or so, I bought a copy of the entire set. In the early 1990s I met other active CLAN IRWIN people like (a distant cousin) MRS. PATRICIA LESKY (and her husband the late Dr. Walt Lesky) and Mrs. Barbara Edelman. PATRICIA LESKY alerted me to the annual IRWIN FAMILY REUNION held in August each year at the Brandywine Manor Presbyterian Church in CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA — a gathering of my specific tribe of Irwins.

I have only gone to the family reunion about three times in the last 30 years — still is a wonderful affair. Genealogy is a bit more time consuming than many wish, if done right. I would advise Clan Irwin members there is a lot of dubious material on the internet — verify with original or public documents. There is a lot of outright FICTION out there.

Of course, as a member of CLAN IRWIN ASSOCIATION I have had the chance to visit the clan tent at the Virginia Scottish Games many times in the 1980s-90s and early 2000s, and several times at Scottish games at Fort Ward Park, Fairhill, Maryland and Stone Mountain Georgia. I even drove up to Ligonier Pennsylvania to visit the Scottish Games there once in the 1990s. I am old now. I don’t get around as much. That is my story. I hope this is helpful.

Introduction

David Weil Family

David, the son of Albert J Weil and Mildred Bittner-Weil

Grandson of Albert M Weil and Matilda Buckheit.

Mildred Bittner-Weil’s parents were Edwin Wynn Bittner and Mary M Irwin- Bittner. His parents were Aaron S. Bittner 1829-1905 and Mary M. Irwin- Bittner, 1861 – 1954. Was the daughter of Robert Irwin, Jr. and Jane Ellen (Eleanor) Moore-Irwin, 1821-1897.

This line came to America about 1729-per family oral history-with John Irwin 1726-1791 and his wife, Rebecca Farland, Not sure of spelling-cannot find anything about her – possible born about 1734.

John was married in America.

Per oral family history, Mary M Irwin-Bittner was named after her Great Aunt, Mary Jamison, 1743-1833. Mary Jamison’s parents were Jane Erwin and Thomas Jamison, 1723-1757.

Janes’ parents were Matthew (possibly James) Irvine or Erwin and Elizabeth Hobson, born 1701. Matthew DOB 1697-1762

This is just an FYI into why a Weil is related to the Irwin Clan.

Mary Elizabeth Weil

My Irwin Story

Kyle David Eriwn

I was born and raised in Peoria, Illinois. Growing up I never heard “stories” about the Erwin family. Sure, there were a few snippets of information, such as we were from the villages of Sebree and Beach Grove, Kentucky. Or that my grandfather, Stambaugh Erwin, was named after the local preacher. Then there was the legend that our original last name was spelled “Ierwin”” (more on that later, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves…)

I suppose the reason for the lack of Erwin lore was that my grandfather was the youngest of his siblings, with the oldest almost twenty years his senior. As a result, the only time we had “family reunions” were what others call funerals. My grandfather passed away when I was in high school, and my father was an only child. The rest of the family did not live near us, so I never really interacted with the other family members.

Fast forward to 2009 when I met and married Paula. Her mother is very interested in genealogy. In Kentucky the state sport (after UK and Louisville basketball) is figuring out how we are related to everyone else. She offered to start a family tree in Ancestry and Family Tree. This piqued my interest in things Erwin, and I began to do some internet research into our family history. Then one day Paula had to spend the day in Evansville, Indiana for business. I knew that Sebree and Beach Grove were across the river from Evansville, so I dropped Paula off for work and headed into Kentucky. My main objective was to find my great grandfather’s grave. What I found were multiple graveyards (in various states of repair or disrepair). One graveyard had multiple tombstones with the name “Eirwin”. So, the old story was correct, just transposed letters. That’s one family mystery solved (later research revealed that Erwin and Eirwin were used somewhat interchangeably in the records of the family). I did find my great grandfather Charles Lyman Erwin’s grave. What I also found was an older site with my third great-grandfather Robert Hutchinson Erwin’s grave. That name will be important later.

In my internet searches I stumbled across the Clan Irwin Association website, and I joined the CIA. That year (2018 I believe) Paula and I attended the now defunct Glasgow Highland Games in Glasgow, Kentucky. It was there that I met Barbara Edelman who with the adroitness of a Barbary pirate within a few minutes shanghaied me into becoming the Kentucky Commissioner!

Being active on the Clan’s Facebook page, one day I saw a post of a memory on one of the Clan members, Steve Erwin, that consisted of a few photographs of his family members visiting Erwin graves in southeastern Missouri. I knew from my research that some Erwins did move to that area in the mid-late 1800’s. Steve and I started to compare notes and lo and behold we are both descendants of Robert Hutchinson Erwin (see-I told you it would be important!). I later took the BigY genetic test, and Steve is my closest genetic relative confirming our genealogical research.

Back to my visit in Beach Grove. There is a nice, albeit small, genealogy center in Beach Grove. (Interestingly it is located at an intersection that contains the only stoplight in the county-they were quite proud of it). While there I located a handwritten tree of another descendant of Robert H. Erwin. Unbeknownst to me then, I later learned that the tree was a line that belongs to Leslie Smeathers, our current Association Corresponding Secretary.

The high point so far in my Erwin journey was the Clan trip to Scotland. Not only did we enjoy the beauty of Scotland, but to be able to actually touch and experience our history was beyond compare. Of course, the story (or should I say journey) is to be continued… Let Irwin Flourish!

Irwin Information

Susan Abadie

Susan has shared lot of family information - please download the pdf files she submitted to view.